Thursday, December 5, 2019

HyperDocs Hype: Extend

"I'm done--now what do I do?"

"I already know how to do this."

"I learned this last year."

"I'm bored."

At some point, we've all heard at least one of these comments in our classrooms. That's because when we work with such a diverse group of students with varying interests, achievement levels, and pacing needs, we often struggle to keep all of our students engaged cognitively all of the time. Fortunately, one of the benefits of a HyperDoc is that we can extend our lessons by tagging on "extension ideas" for the students who finish quickly, need an exciting nudge to stay motivated, and willingly accept challenges on their own. This portion of a HyperDoc also gives you the freedom to work one-on-one with those students who need a little more time or support form you while the rest of the class moves ahead and stays on topic. Once students finish an assignment, you'll find that they will often want to go back and use more web tools from the extend sections, allowing them to continue creating--and further their learning. In a Hyperdoc, the extension activities are a great way to fit in fun activities that you may never seem to have time for, such as art and design thinking.

HyperDoc Share Strategies



EXTEND TOOL: ONLINE GAMES
To keep students on topic, engaged, and learning even after they have completed an assignment, link to an online game like GeoGuessr in your HyperDoc.
21st Century Skills
Critical Thinking

ISTE Standards
Digital Citizenship
Research and Information

SAMR
Augmentation

Sample HyperDoc
goo.gl/WvcJC8
    How to Design
    If you are simply linking students to an online game, you most likely will not need to design anything from scratch. Instead, choose from the multitude of engaging games already available. Simply select one that is content and age appropriate and add a link to it in your Hyperdoc.

    How to Deliver
    In your HyperDoc, link students directly to the online games for extra practice in your class.

    How to Collect
    You probably won't have to worry about collecting student work from the extend portion of your HyperDoc, especially if your students are simply playing online games.
    EXTEND TOOL: WONDEROPOLIS
    As twenty-first-century teachers, it's our job to find the most engaging, relevant, and meaningful websites that will encourage our students' creativity. Wonderopolis is one of the best. This educational resource updates daily, keeping students on topic, engaged in exploring a subject, and wondering (and learning). Wonderopolis is the type of website you'll want to include in your Hyperdoc as an extension activity and one that students will revisit independently long after the lesson is complete.
    21st Century Skills
    Communication
    Critical Thinking
    Creativity

    ISTE Standards
    Technology Operations
    Digital Citizenship
    Critical Thinking
    Research and Information

    SAMR

    Substitution
    Augmentation

    Sample HyperDoc
    goo.gl/hy2LIY
    How to Design
    There is not necessarily a design element with Wonderopolis; instead, determine how you want to encourage your students to use the website. Students could: Search for a "wonder" about a particular topic. Choose an interactive wonder from the Wonder Jar to share with their families. Do a hands-on Maker lesson. Add their own question or wonder to the Wonder Bank.

    How Deliver
    In your HyperDoc, direct students to link to Wonderopolis.org.

    How to Collect
    Discuss interesting things students have learned by reading other people's wonders and answers on Wonderopolis' website. Foster a culture of wondering in your classroom by creating a physical jar for students to put their wonders in. This collection of wonders can launch future individual research topics or class discussions.
    EXTEND TOOL: CANVA
    Canva is an online graphic design platform. It offers free access to a wide assortment of design tools and options that encourage creativity. Students can extend a lesson concept by graphically designing an artifact on Canva.
    21st Century Skills
    Creativity

    ISTE Standards
    Creativity and Innovation

    SAMR

    Augmentation

    Sample HyperDoc
    goo.gl/FBvQeP
    How to Design
    Canva offers wonderful design tutorials so both you and your students can learn the basics of design in addition to more advanced skills and techniques. Use Canva to design something from scratch or choose from the website's incredible library of templates for everything from posters to magazines and infographics. Canva even offers materials so you can teach the basics of graphic design in our classroom.

    How to Deliver

    As with any HyperDoc extension activity, simply add a link to Canva's website and a few simple directions for students.

    Quick Tip: Direct students to the Canva Design School, where they will find video tutorials to quickly transform their graphic design skills!

    How to Collect
    You can collect students' Canva designs in a number of ways. Students can do the following:Download their Canva design directly and turn it in. Take a screenshot of it and add it to their social media site, digital portfolio, etc. Email or share it with themselves, you, or their classmates, etc.
    Turn in a link to it using a Google Form, Padlet, etc.

    Friday, November 22, 2019

    HyperDocs Hype: Reflect

    "We do not learn from experience...we learn from reflecting on experience," said John Dewey, an American philosopher, psychologist, and educational reformer. After challenging students to explore, create, and communicate ideas in a HyperDoc, give them an opportunity to reflect on what they've learned, to evaluate their work using rubrics and checklists, and to set new learning goals. Promoting this growth mindset starts by helping them first identify the steps they take when learning something. This could be done as a class discussion or by using a HyperDoc to capture student thinking. However you choose to lead students through the reflection process, though, they must think about two things:
    1. How they learned.
    2. The academic content--the "what"--they learned using a standard, mandated, or self-created rubric. These rubrics and checklists are generally used for report cards or mandated reporting of student progress, but are helpful to students when they're reflecting on their progress as well. 
    You can personalize a HyperDoc's reflection section to fit your students' individual goals.

    HyperDoc Reflect Strategies


    REFLECT TOOL: PADLET
    In your HyperDoc, link to a Padlet. Padlet is a web tool described as a graffiti wall, online paper, or a digital bulletin board. Teachers can use it to encourage online conversations or quickly collect student thinking.
    21st Century Skills
    Communication
    Collaboration

    ISTE Standards
    Digital Citizenship
    Communication and Collaboration

    SAMR
    Modification

    Sample HyperDoc
    goo.gl/mcLtNs
      How to Design
      Create a Padlet. Add your questions to the heading and share the link to the Padlet using a shortened URL or link it directly to another HyperDoc. Create a list of questions that prompt students to think about their role in the learning process. For best results, we recommend generating reflective questions from one or all three of the following categories:

      Content: Ask the student about what he learned. Use a broad, theme-based question. Who? What? Where? When? Why? How does this connect to what we learned?

      Personal: Ask about the student's individual learning experience. What part of this assignment as difficult for you? Why? How might you approach an activity like this differently next time? How did you contribute to your group's overall effectiveness?

      Collaborative: Ask about the group learning experience and his interactions with his partner. What did your group do well together? How did you support your partner today? How did your group problem solve when there were varying points of view?

      How to Deliver
      At the end of a learning experience, direct students to the Padlet and ask them to record their thinking. Watch the magic unfold as all the thinking in the room is shared in this one live document.
      REFLECT TOOL: WORDLE
      The free word clouds created by Wordle may initially look like just beautiful collections of words on a page, but when you discuss a word cloud with your students, it can lead to deep, complex reflection. Wordle varies the sizes of words based on how many times they're repeated within the document, which makes analyzing why one word is larger than the others a great place to begin a reflection lesson. Depending on what you asked to generate the words, students can look for patterns, share predictions, and make connections to an assignment's content. Using this method of reflection for team building, to review a concept, or to explore a topic provides students with an opportunity to develop higher-level thinking skills.
      21st Century Skills
      Communication
      Critical Thinking
      Collaboration

      ISTE Standards
      Critical Thinking
      Communication and Collaboration

      SAMR
      Modification

      Sample HyperDoc
      goo.gl/8nmMG1
      How to Design
      As you create a question or prompt to generate a set of words around a topic, think about its possible answers and whether or not they would result in a word cloud worthy of rich examination. You can package this portion of your lesson with clear instructions in a HyperDoc.

      How to Collect and Deliver
      An easy way to collect words that will populate a Wordle is through a Google Form.
      Attach a link to the form in your HyperDoc. You can then highlight and copy all of the words in the form's spreadsheet at once.
      Open Wordle and, following the website's instructions, paste the text in the designated location. Change the Wordle's fonts, color, and shape to achieve your desired look and then either download the image or take a screenshot to share in a location so all participants can access it.
      REFLECT TOOL: TABLES IN A GOOGLE DOC
      A popular reflection project is "20% Time." This type of comprehensive project offers students a great opportunity to try new things, explore new topics, take risks, practice time management, and pursue their personal passions. Each week, students work on projects of their choosing, pushing toward a goal and researching ideas. As students work, you provide coaching and feedback. Afterward, students jot notes and reflect on their learning process. And though 20% Time projects are open-ended, you'll be surprised by what your students can do when they have a purpose, and audience, and an opportunity to create.
      21st Century Skills
      Communication
      Critical Thinking
      Collaboration

      ISTE Standards
      Communication and Collaboration

      SAMR
      Augmentation

      Sample HyperDoc
      goo.gl/FY4SSd
      Entire HyperDoc Assignment:
      goo.gl/Hh588r
      How to Design
      Insert a table in a Doc. Post reflective questions in the table. After each weekly work session, give students a chance to reflect on the table on the HyperDoc.

      How to Deliver
      Give students time to respond to the questions each week.  Read the students' responses and offer immediate feedback, asking questions to push thinking, providing resources (as needed), making connections with mentors, and offering motivation.

      How to Collect
      This HyperDoc can be shared through Google Classroom, allowing you to provide consistent feedback and follow along with your students' progress as they document their work each week.
      REFLECT TOOL: GOOGLE DOCS
      As you design your HyperDoc, think carefully about how you will evaluate your students' learning and how that evaluation process will fit the standards mandated for your classroom. One method you may consider is using rubrics and checklists, which can be embedded into a HyperDoc
      21st Century Skills
      Communication
      Critical Thinking
      Collaboration

      ISTE Standards
      Critical Thinking
      Communication and Collaboration

      SAMR
      Modification

      Sample HyperDoc
      goo.gl/fjT8py
      How to Design
      Insert a rubric or checklist into the HyperDoc. On the Google Doc, make a second copy of the rubric or checklist. The purpose of this is so that both the student and the teacher have a space to reflect on the same HyperDoc.

      How to Deliver
      Allow students time to record their thinking in the HyperDoc. While your students are reflecting, teachers complete the same exercise and afterward offer students feedback for each student on their individual HyperDoc.

      How to Collect
      Share the HyperDoc and your students' reflections on the learning process from start to finish with parents and administrators so that they can see student growth.
      REFLECT TOOL: UNIT OF STUDY REFLECTION SLIDE DECK
      Building in time to reflect and capture your students' thoughts in this HyperDoc will help them develop a growth mindset, provide concrete documentation of their reflection as a learner, and set new goals. Preparing for parent-teacher conferences? Let students take full ownership and allow them to facilitate a student-led conference using this HyperDoc.
      21st Century Skills
      Communication
      Critical Thinking
      Collaboration

      ISTE Standards
      Technology Operations
      Critical Thinking
      Communication and Collaboration

      SAMR
      Redefinition

      Sample HyperDoc
      goo.gl/dpscRz
      How to Design
      Create a new slide deck or use the template provided (see Sample HyperDoc), personalizing questions to reflect your study unit's specific learning objectives.

      How to Deliver
      Allow students time to record their thinking in the HyperDoc, which might take multiple class periods. You can give feedback digitally or face-to-face. Also, students can share, read, and reflect with one another.

      How to Collect
      Use the student work collected in this HyperDoc as a learning assessment. Based on your students' responses, where will you take them next?

      Wednesday, November 13, 2019

      HyperDocs Hype: Share

      As you design your HyperDoc, think about how your students will share their final products. If you go the traditional route, students show their work in front of the class, with their parents, or within a small group. You could also print students' work and display it either in the classroom or as a gallery walk. If you opt for transformational sharing, students receive feedback from an audience that goes beyond their classmates, teacher, and parents and includes the public. This elevates the sharing experience and gives students a purpose for real audience, which typically increases the quality of work they turn in and promotes an intrinsic motivation to create something awesome so they can get comments, likes, hearts, and similar feedback from the public.


      HyperDoc Share Strategies


      SHARE TOOL: COMMENTING IN GOOGLE DOCS
      We all regularly ask our colleagues for feedback about our ideas, and just as our peers' comments help us grow as learners, they can help our students, too. That's why it's so important to teach students this practice early on. Fortunately, Google has made digital collaboration simple through its apps' sharing and comments features. Simply ask students to share their work via Google Apps and solicit feedback from a classmate (or two or three) using the HyperDoc. This exercise gives students a real audience while also teaching digital citizenship.
      21st Century Skills
      Communication
      Collaboration

      ISTE Standards
      Digital Citizenship

      SAMR
      Augmentation
        How to Design
        Create a blended learning environment where students can share their work in person and digitally. Offer opportunities to engage in partnerships Invite students to read one another's work in Google Docs and insert thoughtful comments.

        How to Deliver
        Share the HyperDoc with students. Assign students partners with whom to share their Docs. Each partner will read and make comments on the other's work and then return the work to its owner so the owner can read the comments. Students comment on classmates' work as appropriate. You may have to give students examples of effective comments (digital citizenship, effective partnership lessons).

        How to Collect
        Have students click Share to give you editing rights to their HyperDocs. This also allows you to collect their comments whenever you need to.
        SHARE TOOL: GOOGLE SLIDES
        When it comes to selecting a method for sharing student work, sometimes less really is more. Take, for example, Google Slides. Use this tool to get students collaborating and communicating. This simple tool allows students to choose their slides' image, text, videos, links, and graphic designs with little workflow effort. Once a presentation is complete, students can explore one another's work instantly, learning from the content and gaining inspiration for their own designs. Students can also share their completed slide decks through a link or by embedding it into a Google Site, giving an even greater audience the opportunity to explore their work. Working together on one slide deck takes cooperation and it's a great opportunity for students to exhibit digital citizenship.
        21st Century Skills
        Communication
        Collaboration

        ISTE Standards
        Creativity and Innovation
        Technology Operations
        Communication and Collaboration

        SAMR
        Modification
        How to Design
        Create a new Google Slides deck through your Google Drive. Adjust the share settings to "Anyone with a link can edit" while the project is in process, allowing you to control the design as much or as little as you need. For example, you could create one slide for each student, add a template for scaffolded instructions, or even add students' names to avoid confusion when selecting a slide to work on.

        How to Deliver
        Attach a link for a Google Slides presentation directly to a HyperDoc, along with instructions for the project. Since multiple students will be working on the document at one time, it's helpful to keep the slide deck open on your device so you can monitor their progress. You could even project the slide deck in progress onto a screen in the room for instructional purposes, such as to clarify instructions, teach a design technique, or just showcase clever work.

        How to Collect
        Once students have completed their slides, set the presentation to view-only to avoid any further changes being made. Share a link to the slide deck as a QR code, through an email, or by embedding it on a website for easy access.
        SHARE TOOL: STUDENT FILM FESTIVAL
        The primary reason we have students share their work is to provide them with an authentic audience, a group of people to help students share, grow, and celebrate their ideas. Hosting a student film festival will help your lessons reach redefinition, because all four Cs will be implemented in highly engaging ways and will culminate with a live audience. To prepare the film festival, have students produce films with a real purpose: to share their film's messages with a live or digital audience beyond the classroom. This alone increases students' levels of intrinsic motivation.
        21st Century Skills
        Communication
        Critical Thinking
        Creativity
        Collaboration

        ISTE Standards
        Creativity and Innovation
        Technology Operations
        Digital Citizenship
        Communication and Collaboration

        SAMR
        Redefinition

        Sample HyperDoc
        goo.gl/oT0V2S
        How to Design
        You can design a film festival event in many ways: with your own class; as a grade level, department, or school; within the community; or open to the public online. How you design and plan your festival will depend on which method you choose. Design a website to help you curate your film festival's resources, including video examples, rules, categories, deadlines, support resources, etc. Set a deadline and share festival information with participants. Invite an audience and publicize your event. Prepare the venue. Host your film festival!

        How to Deliver
        Curate all media resources on a website. This will make it easier for you, your colleagues, and your students to follow along with the rules, deadlines, etc. Student will go to the HyperDoc site to access festival information and eventually share their films. Walk your students through the video production process, encourage them to produce films about their personal passions, and eventually this will help them prepare to enter their work into the festival. Films can be made in class, at home, or both.

        How to Collect
        Students can submit their films through a Google Form, which you can link to the website where the other resources are curated. The film festival committee (made up of teachers, student leaders, administrators, etc.) can then access the spreadsheet and begin to judge the video submissions. And who knows? Perhaps all the videos will be accepted to the film festival. Sharing the Films with an Authentic Audience (This might include the class, school, community, or public online.) Curate the student-created films in a YouTube playlist. Invite students and their families to a public venue to participate in the film festival. Play the students' films on a large screen for the entire community audience to enjoy together. Watch your students beam with pride as their films are shared on the big screen!
        SHARE TOOL: DIGITAL PORTFOLIOS
        Students love showing their friends and family members their best work, and a digital portfolio allows them to do just that with a click of their mouse. Instead of filing away projects in a box, only to be tucked away in a garage and never looked at again, digital portfolios showcase a student's learning progression. Families can easily access a digital portfolio, time and time again, to revisit student work when it is linked online and packaged in a digital portfolio. Google Slides, Sites, and Blogger are all great platforms for students to publish their projects. Help students set up their digital portfolio's organization, purpose, and structure, and chances are, they will continue to build it long after they leave your classroom.
        21st Century Skills
        Communication
        Critical Thinking
        Creativity
        Collaboration

        ISTE Standards
        Creativity and Innovation
        Technology Operations
        Digital Citizenship
        Critical Thinking
        Research and Information
        Communication and Collaboration

        SAMR
        Redefinition

        Sample HyperDoc
        goo.gl/cJjunP
        goo.gl/EF0nj8
        How to Design
        In the HyperDoc, include the following:
        Video tutorials for building a digital portfolio
        A personalized checklist of projects to include
        A Google Form to turn in completed work; Guidelines for publishing work; An opportunity for students to reflect on the pieces they chose to include in the portfolio

        How to Deliver
        Create a HyperDoc with a list of steps. Throughout the year, use rubrics to promote quality student-created digital content. Add a checklist to the HyperDoc to keep track of what projects should be showcased.

        How to Collect
        Collect portfolio URLs in a Google Form
        SHARE TOOL: GOOGLE FORMS AND SPREADSHEETS
        When you have a lot to accomplish and not enough time to do it all, maximizing face time with students is important. So rather than having every student present their individual projects one at a time while the rest of the class passively listens, have your class share their creations digitally. To do this, provide students with links to both the Google Form and the spreadsheet that has links to all of the projects. Students can then choose which presentations they view and when, having an entire classroom of students with whom to engage and review their peers' projects at one time.
        21st Century Skills
        Communication
        Critical Thinking
        Creativity
        Collaboration

        ISTE Standards
        Technology Operations
        Digital Citizenship
        Communication and Collaboration

        SAMR
        Augmentation

        Sample HyperDoc
        goo.gl/J8XAVg
        How to Design
        In your HyperDoc, attach a Google Form to a prompt like "turn in your work HERE."
        Create a Google Form, being sure to copy the link from the live form. Highlight the word "HERE" and insert the link. Follow the same instructions for sharing the spreadsheet and setting the share settings as view-only.

        How to Deliver
        Students can turn in their work using the link in the HyperDoc. Be sure to share any expectations you may have for viewing projects.

        How to Collect
        Collect your students' work using a Google Form, which creates a spreadsheet that can be shared even outside your classroom.

        Thursday, October 31, 2019

        HyperDocs Hype: Apply

        Do your students consume technology or do they create it? We like to think that when a student consumes technology, the information goes from the computer to his brain, whereas when he creates it, ideas go from him to the computer. And although we often view learning as only taking place during the instructional portion of our lesson, deeper levels of synthesis actually occur during the apply phase. This is when students take the knowledge they've acquired and use it to create something. As you design the apply portion of your HyperDoc, include learning opportunities that will encourage your students to develop their independent and critical thinking as well as problem-solving skills. As students digest and comprehend the lesson's content, allow them to use web tools to hone these skills and demonstrate what they've learned. If we want our students to be creative problem-solvers, then we need to create opportunities for them to practice and develop these skills. Students often develop additional soft skills during the application process, including perseverance, teamwork, flexibility, and time management. 

        An Important Apply Tip for Teachers

        When introducing a new tech tool, Give your students time to play with it before requiring them to create something with it for an assessment. In fact, giving them time to explore the "how-to's" of a web tool using a low cognitive load is as much a part of the learning process as the product itself. For example, have your students create something about themselves using the new tool. You could add a community-building layer to your classroom and ask them to share their creations. When it's time to produce a final product, the students will focus more on the content than struggling to figure out the tool. This could even become a valuable opportunity for students to reflect on and share how they resolved issues and figured out complicated tasks with little direct instruction, further developing their soft skills. This is when the real learning takes place, so it's worth taking time to include and acknowledge.


        HyperDoc Apply Strategies


        APPLY TOOL: POWTOON
        It's a fact: Kids love cartoons. Give your students an opportunity to create their own animated cartoon using PowToon, and just watch as they come alive. PowToon, a comprehensive web tool, offers educators and students limited access for free accounts, templates, and video tutorials. Students can use PowToon's library of characters, settings, and icons, and even their own images and videos to create PowToons that demonstrate a synthesis of the lesson. They can also practice their fluency when they record their voices. With guidelines and a rubric in place, a published PowToon could showcase a student's learning and be used as a formative assessment or on a report card.
        21st Century Skills
        Communication
        Critical Thinking
        Creativity

        ISTE Standards
        Creativity and Innovation
        Technology Operations
        Communication and Collaboration

        SAMR
        Redefinition

        Sample HyperDoc
        goo.gl/XQJ455
        How to Design
        Set up a PowToon account and task your students with logging in with their school-issued Google accounts. Consider giving students time to play with the templates and explore PowToon before asking them to create a video for an assessment. Watch the tutorials together as a class or invite an instructional technology integration specialist into your room to work directly with students.

        How to Deliver
        Students create their PowToons in their own accounts. PowToon is not a collaborative tool, so if students are working in groups, they need to choose one account to use when creating their video.

        How to Collect
        Students publish their video and copy its URL into a Google Form, allowing them to share their work with you and their peers. The teacher can then share the Google Sheet that will contain the links to each student's PowToon. Quick Tip: Before you ask students to create a PowToon, make one yourself to showcase as a mentor video.
        APPLY TOOL: SHOW-WHAT-YOU-KNOW BINGO
        At the end of a unit, rather than grading multiple PowerPoint presentations, let your students decide which web tool would help them best show you what they learned. This added layer of decision is an important component in authentic critical-thinking activities. Plus, chances are, every student will choose from the variety offered.
        21st Century Skills
        Communication
        Critical Thinking
        Creativity
        Collaboration

        ISTE Standards
        Creativity and Innovation
        Technology Operations
        Digital Citizenship
        Critical Thinking
        Research and Information
        Communication and Collaboration

        SAMR
        Redefinition

        Sample HyperDoc
        goo.gl/4wpPQk
        How to Design
        The Show-What-You-Know HyperDoc is widely shared, meant for everyone to use. Just open the document, click File, make a copy, and it's yours. Add or delete any web tools in the table so that it reflects the devices you have in your classroom. Note: The above link showcases tools that we may not support at WG. Alternatively, make a copy of this Creation Tools Cheat Sheet.

        How to Deliver
        To share the HyperDoc, ensure your share settings are set to view-only, then post the link for students to access.

        How to Collect
        In the HyperDoc, change the link in the center of the table and add your own Google Form, where students will turn in their projects. In an effort to move away from presenting one project at a time, offer students the link to your spreadsheet so they can view everyone's work on their own. This enables all of your students to be engaged and learning at the same time--rather than passively listening, which takes valuable class time.

        Monday, October 21, 2019

        HyperDocs Hype: Explain

        Now that your learners are engaged and have had a chance to explore, it's time for the one-two punch: "Bam! This is what I want you to learn." Traditionally, teachers stand in front of the classroom and deliver content in the form of a lecture to their students, who are then expected to retain the information. Occasionally, teachers will use visuals to enhance their explanation or teach the content in another way. You are encouraged, however, to shy away from spending too much time as the "sage on the stage" and become more of a "guide on the side." Part of the reason why a HyperDoc is both teacher- and student-friendly is that your explanation can include instructional videos, online articles, step-by-step blog posts, or an application, making your direct instruction more engaging. Planning a HyperDoc's explanation section allows you, as the teacher, to carefully consider your content delivery as well as how your students will revisit it. For example, some HyperDocs have a built-in explanation, while others provide students links to access content on the Internet. Either way, HyperDocs let you embed your direct instruction in more creative engaging ways so that your students can access it again and again.


        HyperDoc Explain Strategies


        EXPLAIN TOOL: GOOGLE DOCS AND CHROME EXTENSIONS
        Google Chrome extensions are effective, easy-to-add tools that can help you meet your students' specific learning needs. Case in point: If a student comprehends text better when it's read aloud, he could install the Read&Write extension in Google Chrome, and it would read the online text to him. Then, in the Google Doc, he could use the highlighting tools to make note of important text and use the comment features to annotate the Doc with his thinking.
        21st Century Skills
        Critical Thinking

        ISTE Standards

        Technology Operations
        Critical Thinking
        Research and Information

        SAMR

        Augmentation

        Sample HyperDoc

        goo.gl/S47uyp
        How to Design
        Choose an interesting article or text relating to your learning objectives for students to read.
        Paste the text from the article into a Google Doc, making sure to link to the original text and cite your sources. Add directions for reading the text above the article. Include links to a screencast or video for inserting Google Chrome extensions (as needed)


        How to Deliver

        Link directions from the HyperDoc with clear expectations. Students make a copy of the document and place it on their Google Drive. Students then follow the directions according to the Doc.

        How to Collect

        Depending upon your expectations, you can collect your students' thinking in multiple ways, including: anecdotal records based on class discussion student-annotated notes or responses in a Google Doc
        EXPLAIN TOOL: VIDEO INSTRUCTION
        Strategically placing an instructional video in a HyperDoc gives your students access to an "explanation" when they need it, supporting their learning process. And when combined with direct instruction, students can instantly "replay" the day's lesson at their own pace and on their own schedule. This is prefect if a student is absent and misses the lesson or needs to hear a concept more than once. 
        21st Century Skills
        Critical Thinking

        ISTE Standards

        Technology Operations
        Critical Thinking
        Research and Information

        SAMR

        Augmentation

        Sample HyperDoc

        goo.gl/0Fk8P2
        How to Design
        You can choose to use a pre-made instructional video from YouTube, Khan Academy, or TED-Ed, or you can create your own. For web-based content or instructions, use screencasting tools such as the Screencastify Chrome extensionEdpuzzle allows you to create interactive videos and includes accountability features. Keep your videos to a maximum of three minutes and be sure not to use them as substitutions for longer lectures.

        How to Deliver
        Place a link to your video in the HyperDoc next to the section where the instruction is needed. This prevents the student having to take time and search for what she needs to complete her assigned tasks. If you're using Google Slides, Forms, Sites, or MyMaps to package the HyperDoc, the video tutorial can be embedded directly into the page.

        How to Collect
        Sometimes a video will simply be a resource for aiding instruction, while other times it will be a way to check in with your students and assess their comprehension of a topic. Creating a Google Form is one convenient method for doing just this because you can either place a video directly in the form or next to it if the video is embedded on a Google Site. This also helps with grading because all of your students' responses will be collected in one spreadsheet.
        EXPLAIN TOOL: YOUTUBE PLAYLISTS
        YouTube has a great catalog of videos that can help you explain topics in an engaging, fun way. To collect and organize your favorite videos, create a playlist that you can update and share with your students each year.
        21st Century Skills
        Critical Thinking

        ISTE Standards

        Research and Information

        SAMR

        Augmentation

        Sample HyperDoc

        goo.gl/rnhDH0
        How to Design
        Identify the main topics covered using your textbook or unit's content guide and then search and preview videos for each of the topics, adding them to a specific playlist you have created as you go. Ensure you have two to three videos per topic and arrange them in order covered in your unit.

        How to Deliver

        Share your YouTube playlist with students by either linking to it or embedding it directly in a Google Site. Alternatively, to give students easier access to your videos rather than sending them to YouTube, link your playlist of instructional videos to slides in a Google Slides presentation or embed individual videos on a Slide for students to view and respond to in a slide book.

        How to Collect

        Whether you're using a blended learning approach and having students record their thinking on paper or you're going digital and encouraging collaboration, clearly state, label, and post your expectations and instructions. 
        EXPLAIN TOOL: GOOGLE SLIDES BOOKS
        There are more uses for a Google Slides presentation than just giving speeches--in fact, it's actually the perfect tool to use for packaging content. Keeping in mind copyright laws and proper citation practices, you can use Google Slides to create interactive digital textbooks that engage and educate your students through links, videos, and images that appear right alongside the text. The possibilities are endless. And while creating the slides and content may fall to you at first, it can eventually become a great project for students.
        21st Century Skills
        Critical Thinking
        Collaboration

        ISTE Standards

        Technology Operations
        Research and Information
        Communication and Collaboration

        SAMR

        Augmentation
        Modification

        Sample HyperDoc

        goo.gl/FQBZ0z
        goo.gl/8HGDtE
        How to Design
        Create a view-only Google Slides deck.
        Add images, text, and links to additional resources to the slides. If needed, include links to assessment questions. One more design idea: Some creators change the size of their slides to 8.5" by 11", mimicking the original page size for effect. Create a specific space for student input or note-taking and give students instructions for collaboration.

        How to Deliver
        You can share your Google Slides presentation by either linking to it or embedding it directly into a Google Site for easy access. Keep the deck view-only and instruct students to make a copy if you expect them to take notes directly on the slides. To collaborate, students can share copies of their slide decks with their classmates.

        How to Collect
        If a Google Slides presentation is for consumption only and you won't be assessing your students, don't worry about collecting anything. If you link to a Google Form in the slideshow to check your students' comprehension, there will again be no need to collect anything since the responses will automatically populate a spreadsheet. Often, you'll see slideshows that include space for student responses or group collaboration directly on the slides. In this case, students copy and share the slide deck with their teacher.
        EXPLAIN TOOL: EDPUZZLE
        EDpuzzle is a web tool that empowers teachers to turn any video into an engaging lesson. A teacher can crop a video, personalize with voiceovers, and embed quizzes at any time. If you don't want to create your own, you are sure to find one in the EDpuzzle gallery that already fits your needs.
        21st Century Skills
        Critical Thinking

        ISTE Standards

        Technology Operations
        Critical Thinking
        Research and Information

        SAMR

        Augmentation

        Sample HyperDoc

        goo.gl/R099Aj
        How to Design
        EDpuzzle has an extensive database of video content that you are free to explore and use. Find a video that aligns with your lesson and customize it with voiceovers and questions to fit your needs, or you can create your own video!

        How to Deliver

        EDpuzzle allows you to invite students to the "classroom." You can even import a class from Google Classroom. You can store your content and share it with multiple classes as well as assign a due date. Students will each receive their own EDpuzzle account, login, and questions to which they'll respond to while watching the video. In a blended learning classroom, you could use EDpuzzle during "centers," when students are cycling through a rotation of learning opportunities focused on a specific topic.

        How to Collect

        You can use your EDpuzzle teacher login to collect your students' responses to the video prompts.

        Tuesday, October 8, 2019

        HyperDocs Hype: Explore



        Once the stage is set and your class is engaged, offer your students time to more thoroughly explore a topic by providing them with an exploration activity in your HyperDoc. You can start preparing for this portion of the lesson early on by collecting your favorite resource links that promote thought and ignite curiosity. As they explore, students will begin learning about the topic, forming their own opinions, and asking questions. And because students have countless resources readily available at their fingertips, they tend to dive into a rabbit hole and become so immersed in the information they're finding that they don't want to stop exploring. Of course, this excitement is also one of the many benefits of creating exploration time. Don't be too surprised if your students continue exploring the topic at their own pace at home or at school and begin finding their own favorite links to information about your topic to explore. In fact, you may even consider adding a section to your HyperDoc where students can share their newly discovered resources with one another. Allowing time for students to explore and share their ideas about a topic before launching into specific learning objectives creates a curious classroom community that's willing to take risks and ask questions.

        HyperDoc Exploration Strategies



        EXPLORE TOOL: MULTIMEDIA TEXT SETS
        A multimedia text set is a collection of text about a topic that includes a variety of information sources such as websites, articles, videos, images, quotes, and infographics. Students explore the collection of resources and are immersed in the various perspectives presented on the same topic. Exploring a multimedia text set requires that students practice their digital literacy skills and build schema on the topic.
        21st Century Skills
        Communication
        Critical Thinking

        ISTE Standards
        Technology Operations
        Critical Thinking
        Research and Information
        Communication and Collaboration

        SAMR
        Modification

        Sample HyperDoc
        goo.gl/r2EdCV
        How to Design
        Insert a two-column table in a Google Doc.
        In one column, link students to a resource.
        In the second column, create a way for students to respond to a broader question, record their thinking, and/or take notes.

        How to Deliver
        Share the Doc with students. When students click on the linked resources in the table, a new tab will pop up in the web browser with teacher-selected text. In the new tab, students read and explore the link. Students then record their notes in the Google Doc.

        How to Collect
        Through Google Classroom:
        Create an assignment in Google Classroom.
        Select the option to make a copy for each student so you can collect individual student data.
        Provide feedback on the Doc.
        EXPLORE TOOL: YOUTUBE PLAYLISTS
        After students have read an article or text excerpt about a topic, give them visual content so
        they can explore further. Watching videos helps improve a student's understanding of the topic at hand, while offering students who need this type of visual and auditory support easier access to your curriculum. When you invite students to explore a topic through videos, it helps
        to pre-curate the content by creating a YouTube playlist. You can then link students to your playlist in your HyperDoc, allowing them to quickly access and explore the content on their own or with a classmate.
        21st Century Skills
        Communication
        Critical Thinking

        ISTE Standards
        Technology Operations
        Critical Thinking
        Research and Information
        Communication and Collaboration

        SAMR
        Augmentation

        Sample HyperDoc
        goo.gl/e9z0FQ
        How to Design
        Create a new YouTube playlist featuring relevant videos for your students to explore.
        In your Hyperdoc, state your expectations for students as they watch the videos. Will they respond to a prompt after they watch the video? Discuss a new discovery with classmates? Or will they just explore for the sake of exploring?

        How to Deliver
        Include a link to your YouTube playlist in your HyperDoc. As students watch the videos, they will take notes in a notebook.

        How to Collect
        Depending on what you expect from the exploration time, you can collect student thinking in multiple ways:
        Anecdotal records based on conversations (formative assessment)
        Student responses in a notebook
        A collection form where students submit videos they have found
        EXPLORE TOOL: GOOGLE MYMAPS
        To help students develop curiosity for learning, we must provide them with opportunities to
        explore their interests. Creating personalized Google MyMaps is one way to do just this. Using this web tool, you can actually "plant" content where it took place on a map and then post corresponding text, images, videos, and links to take students to the next portion of the assignment. For example, if you were to drop a pin on Mount St. Helens, your students could view a video of the volcano erupting and then zoom in on the map to see the actual scarring left on the earth. Google MyMaps pins encourage students to determine their learning's pace
        and path and engages their curiosity so they want to see what the next pin has in store. As students progress, you could add another layer to this powerful learning tool by having them
        create their own maps.
        21st Century Skills
        Critical Thinking

        ISTE Standards
        Technology Operations
        Critical Thinking
        Research and Information

        SAMR
        Augmentation
        Modification

        Sample HyperDoc
        goo.gl/jSsFqU
        How to Design
        In Google Drive, select New and then MyMaps.
        Create a personal Google MyMap. Add locations by placing markers in strategic places.
        Post the content you want students to discover for each location.

        How to Deliver
        Embed your map or share its link on a Google Site or share a link to your MyMap via Google Classroom. Discuss how to explore the map to not only learn its content, but also how to view it as a mentor text.

        How to Collect
        After exploring the map, discuss the elements, discuss the topic with students and explain how to use MyMaps. This prepares students for an application step later on in the lesson should they choose to create their own MyMap.